Tuesday, June 19, 2012

NALBANDIAN DISQUALIFIED FOR KICK AT QUEEN'S

NALBANDIAN KICKED OUT OF QUEEN’S
CLUB FINAL FOR INJURING LINE JUDGE
http://www.dnaindia.com - Even as the ball left his racket, David Nalbandian knew it was going out. He had just played a running forehand at break point down and was evidently going to surrender the game. Marin Cilic's skilful service return had pinned him into the corner, and the Croatian was about to seize a crucial break in the second set. Everybody could see that. But what nobody could have foreseen was what happened next. Nalbandian's momentum had taken him to the very edge of the court. Out of the corner of his eye he would have spied a plywood advertising hoarding maybe four feet across - blue, with the Nike tick. What he failed to spot was the modest figure of line judge Andrew McDougall, sitting in a small chair behind it. 
In an instant, the frustration and rage inside Nalbandian at losing such a crucial game exploded from him. He aimed a huge kick at the hoarding.  The speed at which Nalbandian was travelling - close to full pelt - would have turned his tennis shoe into a blunt and brutal weapon. It was a shot Carlos Tevez would have been proud of.

"Sometimes you get angry," he said later. "Sometimes you cannot control those moments. Maybe you throw a racket or maybe you scream or maybe you do something like that. So many things happen." This is what happened: the hoarding smashed into pieces, clattering into the left shin of McDougall, a balding 54-year-old gentleman in sunglasses, who recoiled instantly in pain. As the crowd gasped, Nalbandian appeared slowly to grasp the gravity of what he had just done. Officials rushed to McDougall's aid. He pulled up the left leg of his cream trousers, smeared red like a jam scone. Blood was seeping from a one-inch gash. As a result of his crazy action, Nalbandian was disqualified. The spectators at Queen's, some of whom had paid over pounds 100 for their Sunday ticket, will certainly not forgive him. Many of them had missed Nalbandian's fleeting moment of madness, and as the match was terminated, boos rang out from all four sides of the court. 
Cilic was awarded the title by default and Nalbandian was fined the maximum $12,560 and placed under police investigation.



Argentine tennis player David Nalbandian might find himself more than £40,000 out of pocket after he was disqualified from the Queen’s Club Final. The match was two sets old when Nalbandian, after missing a shot, lashed out in frustration and kicked an advertising board in front of line judge Andrew McDougal which left the official with a bloodied left shin. Nalbandian apologised for his actions, but was disqualified for unsporting behaviour. Anger arising from frustration of material desires is called "viroda-yukta-krodha".

WHAT DO THE VEDIC TEACHINGS TELL US? 
Krodha (anger) is the product of kāma (lust), which is the result of the mode of passion. When lust and hankering are unsatisfied, the element of krodha appears, which is the formidable enemy of the conditioned soul. This most sinful and inimical passion is represented as ahańkāra, or the false egocentric attitude of thinking oneself to be all in all. Such an egocentric attitude on the part of the conditioned soul, who is completely under the control of material nature, is described in Bhagavad-gītā as foolish. 
The egocentric attitude is a manifestation of the Rudra principle in the heart, wherein krodha (anger) is generated. This anger develops in the heart and is further manifested through various senses, like the eyes, hands and legs. When a man is angry he expresses such anger with red-hot eyes and sometimes makes a display of clenching his fists or kicking his legs.



Śrīla A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupāda :
Śrīmad Bhāgavatam - Canto 3: "The Status Quo"   
Chapter 12: "Creation of the Kumāras and Others"
Verse 11 - Bhaktivedanta VedaBase

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